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Internet Papers Publications Software releases

new paper “Chhoyhopper: A Moving Target Defense with IPv6” at NDSS MADWeb Workshop 2022

On April 24, 2022 we will publish a new paper titled “Chhoyhopper: A Moving Target Defense with IPv6” by A S M Rizvi and John Heidemann at the 4th Workshop on Measurements, Attacks, and Defenses for the Web (MADWeb 2022), co-located with NDSS. We provide Chhoyhopper as an open-source tool for SSH and HTTPS—try it out!

From the abstract:

Services on the public Internet are frequently scanned, then subject to brute-force password attempts and Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks. We would like to run such services stealthily, where they are available to friends but hidden from adversaries. In this work, we propose a discovery-resistant moving target defense named “Chhoyhopper” that utilizes the vast IPv6 address space to conceal publicly available services. The client meets the server at an IPv6 address that changes in a pattern based on a shared, pre-distributed secret and the time of day. By hopping over a /64 prefix, services cannot be found by active scanners, and passively observed information is useless after two minutes. We demonstrate our system with the two important applications—SSH and HTTPS, and make our system publicly available.

Client and server interaction in Chhoyhopper. A Client with the right secret key can only get access into the system.

Thanks: A S M Rizvi and John Heidemann’s work on this paper is supported, in part, by the DHS HSARPA Cyber Security Division via contract number HSHQDC-17-R-B0004-TTA.02-0006-I (PAADDoS), and by DARPA under Contract No. HR001120C0157 (SABRES). Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF or DARPA. We thank Rayner Pais who prototyped an early version of Chhoyhopper and version in IPv4 hopping over ports.

Categories
Presentations Publications

new poster “Chhoyhopper: A Moving Target Defense with IPv6” at ACSAC-2021

We published a new poster titled “Chhoyhopper: A Moving Target Defense with IPv6” by A S M Rizvi (USC/ISI) and John Heidemann (USC/ISI) at ACSAC-2021. We presented our poster virtually using a video. We provide chhoyhopper as open source–try it out!

Client and server interaction in Chhoyhopper. A client with a shared secret key can only get access to the system.

From the abstract:

Services on the public Internet are frequently scanned, then subject to brute-force and denial-of-service attacks. We would like to run such services stealthily, available to friends but hidden from adversaries. In this work, we propose a moving target defense named “Chhoyhopper” that utilizes the vast IPv6 address space to conceal publicly available services. The client and server hop to different IPv6 addresses in a pattern based on a shared, pre-distributed secret and the time of day. By hopping over a /64 prefix, services cannot be found by active scanners, and passively observed information is useless after two minutes. We demonstrate our system with the two important applications—SSH and HTTPS.

This work is supported, in part, by DHS HSARPA Cyber Security Division via contract number HSHQDC-17-R-B0004-TTA.02-0006-I, and by DARPA under Contract No. HR001120C0157.

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Uncategorized

network outages in Louisiana with Hurricane Ida

We’ve been watching the situation in Louisiana develop with Hurricane Ida with our Trinocular Internet outage detection system.

Internet outages in Louisiana at 8:30pm Sunday evening August 29, corresponding to Hurricane Ida’s landfall.

Data as of 2021-08-30t01:30Z, which is 8:30pm Sunday night August 29 in New Orleans, shows about half of the networks in the New Orleans area being unreachable (mostly IPv4 home networks). Following shortly after landfall, these outages correspond with news reports about widespread power loss. Current data is appearing on our Internet outage map.

We wish the residents of Louisiana the best and hope for a rapid recovery.

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Uncategorized

ANT research group lunch

At the end of June we had an ANT research group lunch to celebrate four (!) recent PhD defenses in 2020 and 2021: Hang Guo, Calvin Ardi, Lan Wei, and Abdul Qadeer. Although not everyone could be there (Hang has already moved for his new job), and the ANT lab includes a number of people outside of L.A. who could not make it, us students, staff, and family in L.A. had a great time at Vista del Mar Park near the beach!

A big thanks to Basileal Imana and ASM Rizvi for coordinating delivery of Ethiopian food for lunch.

We are also very thankful that vaccine availability in the U.S. is widespread and we were able to get together face-to-face after a year of Covid limitations. I’m happy that we’ve been able to do good work throughout the pandemic with remote collaboration tools and occasional on-site access, but it was nice to see old friends face-to-face again and share a meal. We hope the fall’s in-person classes at USC go well.

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Uncategorized

new talk “Observing the Global IPv4 Internet: What IP Addresses Show” as an SKC Science and Technology Webinar

John Heidemann gave the talk “Observing the Global IPv4 Internet: What IP Addresses Show” at the SKC Science and Technology Webinar, hosted by Deepankar Medhi (U. Missouri-Kansas City and NSF) on June 18, 2021.  A video of the talk is on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4A_gFXi2WeY. Slides are available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann21a.pdf.

From the abstract:Covid and non-Covid network changes in India; part of a talk about measuring the IPv4 Internet.

Since 2014 the ANT lab at USC has been observing the visible IPv4 Internet (currently 5 million networks measured every 11 minutes) to detect network outages. This talk explores how we use this large-scale, active measurement to estimate Internet reliability and understand the effects of real-world events such as hurricanes. We have recently developed new algorithms to identify Covid-19-related Work-from-Home and other Internet shutdowns in this data. Our Internet outage work is joint work of John Heidemann, Lin Quan, Yuri Pradkin, Guillermo Baltra, Xiao Song, and Asma Enayet with contributions from Ryan Bogutz, Dominik Staros, Abdulla Alwabel, and Aqib Nisar.

This project is joint work of a number of people listed in the abstract above, and is supported by NSF 2028279 (MINCEQ) and CNS-2007106 (EIEIO). All data from this paper is available at no cost to researchers.

Categories
Data Papers Publications

New paper “Auditing for Discrimination in Algorithms Delivering Job Ads” at TheWebConf 2021

We published a new paper “Auditing for Discrimination in Algorithms Delivering Job Ads” by Basileal Imana (University of Southern California), Aleksandra Korolova (University of Southern California) and John Heidemann (University of Southern California/ISI) at TheWebConf 2021 (WWW ’21).

From the abstract:

Skew in the delivery of real-world ads on Facebook (FB) but not LinkedIn (LI).
Comparison of ad delivery using “Reach” (R) and “Conversion” (C) campaign objectives on Facebook. There is skew for both cases but less skew for “Reach”.

Ad platforms such as Facebook, Google and LinkedIn promise value for advertisers through their targeted advertising. However, multiple studies have shown that ad delivery on such platforms can be skewed by gender or race due to hidden algorithmic optimization by the platforms, even when not requested by the advertisers. Building on prior work measuring skew in ad delivery, we develop a new methodology for black-box auditing of algorithms for discrimination in the delivery of job advertisements. Our first contribution is to identify the distinction between skew in ad delivery due to protected categories such as gender or race, from skew due to differences in qualification among people in the targeted audience. This distinction is important in U.S. law, where ads may be targeted based on qualifications, but not on protected categories. Second, we develop an auditing methodology that distinguishes between skew explainable by differences in qualifications from other factors, such as the ad platform’s optimization for engagement or training its algorithms on biased data. Our method controls for job qualification by comparing ad delivery of two concurrent ads for similar jobs, but for a pair of companies with different de facto gender distributions of employees. We describe the careful statistical tests that establish evidence of non-qualification skew in the results. Third, we apply our proposed methodology to two prominent targeted advertising platforms for job ads: Facebook and LinkedIn. We confirm skew by gender in ad delivery on Facebook, and show that it cannot be justified by differences in qualifications. We fail to find skew in ad delivery on LinkedIn. Finally, we suggest improvements to ad platform practices that could make external auditing of their algorithms in the public interest more feasible and accurate.

This paper was awarded runner-up for best student paper at The Web Conference 2021.

The data from this paper is upon request, please see our dataset page.

This work was reported in the popular press: The InterceptMIT Technology ReviewWall Street JournalThe RegisterVentureBeatReutersThe VergeEngadgetAssociated Press.

Categories
Announcements Projects

new project “Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine” (MINCEQ)

We are happy to announce a new project “Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine” (MINCEQ).

Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (RAPID-MINCEQ) is a project to measure changes in Internet use during the COVID-19 outbreak of 2020. As the world grapples with COVID-19, work-from-home and study-from-home are widely employed. Implementation of these policies varies across the U.S. and globally due to local circumstances. A common consequence is a huge shift in Internet use, with schools and workplaces emptying and home Internet use increasing. The goal of this project is to observe this shift, globally, through changes in Internet address usage, allowing observation of early reactions to COVID and, one hopes, a future shift back.

This project plans to develop two complementary methods of assessing Internet use by measuring address activity and how it changes relative to historical trends. The project will directly measure Internet address use globally based on continuous, ongoing measurements of more than 4 million IPv4 networks. The project will also directly measure Internet address use in network traffic at a regional Internet exchange point where multiple Internet providers interconnect. The first approach provides a global picture, while the second provides a more detailed but regional picture; together they will help evaluate measurement accuracy.

The project website is at https://ant.isi.edu/minceq/index.html. The PI is John Heidemann. This work is supported by NSF as a RAPID award in response to COVID-19, award NSF-2028279.

Categories
Social

group lunch in honor of a departure and two arrivals

On November 14 we had a group lunch near ISI to celebrate the completion of Joao Ceron’s visit from the University of Twente as a visiting scholar, to welcome Asma Enayet to the group as a new PhD student, and to welcome Hang Guo’s son into the world. (Hang was understandably not able to make the lunch.) Happy Thanksgiving to all!

A group lunch in honor of Asma (left) and Joao (6th left).
Categories
Publications Technical Report

new technical report “Improving the Optics of Active Outage Detection (extended)”

We have released a new technical report “Improving the Optics of the Active Outage Detection (extended)”, by Guillermo Baltra and John Heidemann, as ISI-TR-733.

From the abstract:

A sample block showing changes in block usage (c), and outage detection results of Trinocular (b) and improved with the Full Block Scanning Algorithm (a).

There is a growing interest in carefully observing the reliability of the Internet’s edge. Outage information can inform our understanding of Internet reliability and planning, and it can help guide operations. Outage detection algorithms using active probing from third parties have been shown to be accurate for most of the Internet, but inaccurate for blocks that are sparsely occupied. Our contributions include a definition of outages, which we use to determine how many independent observers are required to determine global outages. We propose a new Full Block Scanning (FBS) algorithm that gathers more information for sparse blocks to reduce false outage reports. We also propose ISP Availability Sensing (IAS) to detect maintenance activity using only external information. We study a year of outage data and show that FBS has a True Positive Rate of 86%, and show that IAS detects maintenance events in a large U.S. ISP.

All data from this paper will be publicly available.

Categories
Presentations

Talks at DNS-OARC 61

Wes Hardaker gave two presentations at DNS-OARC on November 1st, 2019. The first was a presentation about the previously announced “Cache me if you can” paper, which is on youtube, and the slides are available as well. The second talk presented Haoyu Jiang’s work during the summer of 2018 on analyzing DNS B-Root traffic during the 2018 DITL data for levels of traffic sent by the Chrome web browser, levels of traffic associated with different languages, and levels of traffic sent by different label lengths. It is available on youtube with the slides here.