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Announcements Students

congratulations to Liang Zhu for his new PhD

I would like to congratulate Dr. Liang Zhu for defending his PhD in August 2018 and completing his doctoral dissertation “Balancing Security and Performance of Network Request-Response Protocols” in September 2018.

Liang Zhu (left) and John Heidemann, after Liang’s PhD defense.

From the abstract:

The Internet has become a popular tool to acquire information and knowledge. Usually information retrieval on the Internet depends on request-response protocols, where clients and servers exchange data. Despite of their wide use, request-response protocols bring challenges for security and privacy. For example, source-address spoofing enables denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, and eavesdropping of unencrypted data leaks sensitive information in request-response protocols. There is often a trade-off between security and performance in request-response protocols. More advanced protocols, such as Transport Layer Security (TLS), are proposed to solve these problems of source spoofing and eavesdropping. However, developers often avoid adopting those advanced protocols, due to performance costs such as client latency and server memory requirement. We need to understand the trade-off between security and performance for request-response protocols and find a reasonable balance, instead of blindly prioritizing one of them.
This thesis of this dissertation states that it is possible to improve security of network request-response protocols without compromising performance, by protocol and deployment optimizations, that are demonstrated through measurements of protocol developments and deployments. We support the thesis statement through three specific studies, each of which uses measurements and experiments to evaluate the development and optimization of a request-response protocol. We show that security benefits can be achieved with modest performance costs. In the first study, we measure the latency of OCSP in TLS connections. We show that OCSP has low latency due to its wide use of CDN and caching, while identifying certificate revocation to secure TLS. In the second study, we propose to use TCP and TLS for DNS to solve a range of fundamental problems in DNS security and privacy. We show that DNS over TCP and TLS can achieve favorable performance with selective optimization. In the third study, we build a configurable, general-purpose DNS trace replay system that emulates global DNS hierarchy in a testbed and enables DNS experiments at scale efficiently. We use this system to further prove the reasonable performance of DNS over TCP and TLS at scale in the real world.

In addition to supporting our thesis, our studies have their own research contributions. Specifically, In the first work, we conducted new measurements of OCSP by examining network traffic of OCSP and showed a significant improvement of OCSP latency: a median latency of only 20ms, much less than the 291ms observed in prior work. We showed that CDN serves 94% of the OCSP traffic and OCSP use is ubiquitous. In the second work, we selected necessary protocol and implementation optimizations for DNS over TCP/TLS, and suggested how to run a production TCP/TLS DNS server [RFC7858]. We suggested appropriate connection timeouts for DNS operations: 20s at authoritative servers and 60s elsewhere. We showed that the cost of DNS over TCP/TLS can be modest. Our trace analysis showed that connection reuse can be frequent (60%-95% for stub and recursive resolvers). We showed that server memory is manageable (additional 3.6GB for a recursive server), and latency of connection-oriented DNS is acceptable (9%-22% slower than UDP). In the third work, we showed how to build a DNS experimentation framework that can scale to emulate a large DNS hierarchy and replay large traces. We used this experimentation framework to explore how traffic volume changes (increasing by 31%) when all DNS queries employ DNSSEC. Our DNS experimentation framework can benefit other studies on DNS performance evaluations.

Categories
DNS Papers Publications

new conference paper “When the Dike Breaks: Dissecting DNS Defenses During DDoS” at ACM IMC 2018

We have published a new paper “When the Dike Breaks: Dissecting DNS Defenses During DDoS” in the ACM Internet Measurements Conference (IMC 2018) in Boston, Mass., USA.

From the abstract:

Caching and retries protect half of clients even with 90% loss and an attack twice the cache duration. (Figure 7c from [Moura18b].)

The Internet’s Domain Name System (DNS) is a frequent target of Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks, but such attacks have had very different outcomes—some attacks have disabled major public websites, while the external effects of other attacks have been minimal. While on one hand the DNS protocol is relatively simple, the \emph{system} has many moving parts, with multiple levels of caching and retries and replicated servers. This paper uses controlled experiments to examine how these mechanisms affect DNS resilience and latency, exploring both the client side’s DNS \emph{user experience}, and server-side traffic. We find that, for about 30\% of clients, caching is not effective. However, when caches are full they allow about half of clients to ride out server outages that last less than cache lifetimes, Caching and retries together allow up to half of the clients to tolerate DDoS attacks longer than cache lifetimes, with 90\% query loss, and almost all clients to tolerate attacks resulting in 50\% packet loss. While clients may get service during an attack, tail-latency increases for clients. For servers, retries during DDoS attacks increase normal traffic up to $8\times$. Our findings about caching and retries help explain why users see service outages from some real-world DDoS events, but minimal visible effects from others.

Datasets from this paper are available at no cost and are listed at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/dns/#Moura18b_data.

 

Categories
DNS Papers Presentations Publications

New paper and talk “Enumerating Privacy Leaks in DNS Data Collected above the Recursive” at NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop 2018

Basileal Imana presented the paper “Enumerating Privacy Leaks in DNS Data Collected  above the Recursive” at NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on February 18, 2018. Talk slides are available at https://ant.isi.edu/~imana/presentations/Imana18b.pdf and paper is available at  https://ant.isi.edu/~imana/papers/Imana18a.pdf, or can be found at the DNS privacy workshop page.

From the abstract:

Threat model for enumerating leaks above the recursive (left). Percentage of four categories of queries containing IPv4 addresses in their QNAMEs. (right)

As with any information system consisting of data derived from people’s actions, DNS data is vulnerable to privacy risks. In DNS, users make queries through recursive resolvers to authoritative servers. Data collected below (or in) the recursive resolver directly exposes users, so most prior DNS data sharing focuses on queries above the recursive resolver. Data collected above a recursive resolver has largely been seen as posing a minimal privacy risk since recursive resolvers typically aggregate traffic for many users, thereby hiding their identity and mixing their traffic. Although this assumption is widely made, to our knowledge it has not been verified. In this paper we re-examine this assumption for DNS traffic above the recursive resolver. First, we show that two kinds of information appear in query names above the recursive resolver: IP addresses and sensitive domain names, such as those pertaining to health, politics, or personal or lifestyle information. Second, we examine how often these classes of potentially sensitive names appear in Root DNS traffic, using 48 hours of B-Root data from April 2017.

This is a joint work by Basileal Imana (USC), Aleksandra Korolova (USC) and John Heidemann (USC/ISI).

The DITL dataset (ITL_B_Root-20170411) used in this work is available from DHS IMPACT, the ANT project, and through DNS-OARC.

Categories
Publications Software releases Technical Report

new technical report “LDplayer: DNS Experimentation at Scale”

We released a new technical report “LDplayer: DNS Experimentation at Scale”, ISI-TR-722, available at https://www.isi.edu/publications/trpublic/pdfs/ISI-TR-722.pdf.

ldplayer_overviewFrom the abstract:

DNS has evolved over the last 20 years, improving in security and privacy and broadening the kinds of applications it supports. However, this evolution has been slowed by the large installed base with a wide range of implementations that are slow to change. Changes need to be carefully planned, and their impact is difficult to model due to DNS optimizations, caching, and distributed operation. We suggest that experimentation at scale is needed to evaluate changes and speed DNS evolution. This paper presents LDplayer, a configurable, general-purpose DNS testbed that enables DNS experiments to scale in several dimensions: many zones, multiple levels of DNS hierarchy, high query rates, and diverse query sources. LDplayer provides high fidelity experiments while meeting these requirements through its distributed DNS query replay system, methods to rebuild the relevant DNS hierarchy from traces, and efficient emulation of this hierarchy of limited hardware. We show that a single DNS server can correctly emulate multiple independent levels of the DNS hierarchy while providing correct responses as if they were independent. We validate that our system can replay a DNS root traffic with tiny error (+/- 8ms quartiles in query timing and +/- 0.1% difference in query rate). We show that our system can replay queries at 87k queries/s, more than twice of a normal DNS Root traffic rate, maxing out one CPU core used by our customized DNS traffic generator. LDplayer’s trace replay has the unique ability to evaluate important design questions with confidence that we capture the interplay of caching, timeouts, and resource constraints. As an example, we can demonstrate the memory requirements of a DNS root server with all traffic running over TCP, and we identified performance discontinuities in latency as a function of client RTT.

Software developed in this paper is available at https://ant.isi.edu/software/ldplayer/.

 

 

Categories
Papers Publications

new conference paper “Recursives in the Wild: Engineering Authoritative DNS Servers” in IMC 2017

The paper “Recursives in the Wild: Engineering Authoritative DNS Servers” will appear in the 2017 Internet Measurement Conference (IMC) on November 1-3, 2017 in London, United Kingdom.

Recursive DNS server selection of authoritatives, per continent. (Figure 4 from [Mueller17b].)
From the abstract:

In In Internet Domain Name System (DNS), services operate authoritative name servers that individuals query through recursive resolvers. Operators strive to provide reliability by operating multiple name servers (NS), each on a separate IP address, and by using IP anycast to allow NSes to provide service from many physical locations. To meet their goals of minimizing latency and balancing load across NSes and anycast, operators need to know how recursive resolvers select an NS, and how that interacts with their NS deployments. Prior work has shown some recursives search for low latency, while others pick an NS at random or round robin, but did not examine how prevalent each choice was. This paper provides the first analysis of how recursives select between name servers in the wild, and from that we provide guidance to operators how to engineer their name servers to reach their goals. We conclude that all NSes need to be equally strong and therefore we recommend to deploy IP anycast at every single authoritative.

All datasets used in this paper (but one) are available at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/dns/index.html#recursives .

Categories
Publications Technical Report

new technical report “LDplayer: DNS Experimentation at Scale (abstract with poster)”

We released a new technical report “LDplayer: DNS Experimentation at Scale (abstract with poster)”, ISI-TR-721, available at https://www.isi.edu/publications/trpublic/pdfs/ISI-TR-721.pdf.

The poster abstract and poster (included as part of the technical report) appeared at the poster session at the SIGCOMM 2017 in August 2017 in Los Angeles, CA, USA.

From the abstract:

In the last 20 years the core of the Domain Name System (DNS) has improved in security and privacy, and DNS use broadened from name-to-address mapping to a critical roles in service discovery and anti-spam. However, protocol evolution and expansion of use has been slow because advances must consider a huge and diverse installed base. We suggest that experimentation at scale can fill this gap. To meet the need for experimentation at scale, this paper presents LDplayer, a configurable, general-purpose DNS testbed. LDplayer enables DNS experiments to scale in several dimensions: many zones, multiple levels of DNS hierarchy, high query rates, and diverse query sources. To meet these requirements while providing high fidelity experiments, LDplayer includes a distributed DNS query replay system and methods to rebuild the relevant DNS hierarchy from traces. We show that a single DNS server can correctly emulate multiple independent levels of the DNS hierarchy while providing correct responses as if they were independent. We show the importance of our system to evaluate pressing DNS design questions, using it to evaluate changes in DNSSEC key size.

Categories
Publications Technical Report

new technical report “Verfploeter: Broad and Load-Aware Anycast Mapping”

We have released a new technical report “Verfploeter: Broad and Load-Aware Anycast Mapping”,by Wouter B. de Vries, Ricardo de O. Schmidt, Wes Haraker, John Heidemann, Pieter-Tjerk de Boer, and Aiko Pras as an ISI technical report ISI-TR-717.

Verfploeter coverage of B-Root. Circle radiuses are how many /24 blocks in each 2×2 degree region go to B-Root, and colored slices indicate which go to LAX and which to MIA. (Figure 2b from [Vries17a], dataset: SBV-5-15).
From the abstract:

IP anycast provides DNS operators and CDNs with automatic fail-over and reduced latency by breaking the Internet into catchments, each served by a different anycast site. Unfortunately, understanding and predicting changes to catchments as sites are added or removed has been challenging. Current tools such as RIPE Atlas or commercial equivalents map from thousands of vantage points (VPs), but their coverage can be inconsistent around the globe. This paper proposes Verfploeter, a new method that maps anycast catchments using active probing. Verfploeter provides around 3.8M virtual VPs, 430x the 9k physical VPs in RIPE Atlas, providing coverage of the vast majority of networks around the globe.  We then add load information from prior service logs to provide calibrated predictions of anycast changes. Verfploeter has been used to evaluate the new anycast for B-Root, and we also report its use of a 9-site anycast testbed. We show that the greater coverage made possible by Verfploeter’s active probing is necessary to see routing differences in regions that have sparse coverage from RIPE Atlas, like South America and China.

All datasets used in this paper (but one) are available at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/anycast/index.html#verfploeter .

 

Categories
Papers Publications

new conference paper “Does Anycast Hang up on You?” in TMA 2017

The paper “Does Anycast hang up on you?” will appear in the 2017 Conference on Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis (TMA) July 21-23, 2017 in Dublin, Ireland.

In each anycast-based DNS root service, there are about 1% VPs see a route flip happens every one or two observation during a week with an observation interval as 4 minutes. (Figure 2 from [Wei17b]).
From the abstract:

Anycast-based services today are widely used commercially, with several major providers serving thousands of important websites. However, to our knowledge, there has been only limited study of how often anycast fails because routing changes interrupt connections between users and their current anycast site. While the commercial success of anycast CDNs means anycast usually work well, do some users end up shut out of anycast? In this paper we examine data from more than 9000 geographically distributed vantage points (VPs) to 11 anycast services to evaluate this question. Our contribution is the analysis of this data to provide the first quantification of this problem, and to explore where and why it occurs. We see that about 1\% of VPs are anycast unstable, reaching a different anycast site frequently (sometimes every query). Flips back and forth between two sites in 10 seconds are observed in selected experiments for given service and VPs. Moreover, we show that anycast instability is persistent for some VPs—a few VPs never see a stable connections to certain anycast services during a week or even longer. The vast majority of VPs only saw unstable routing towards one or two services instead of instability with all services, suggesting the cause of the instability lies somewhere in the path to the anycast sites. Finally, we point out that for highly-unstable VPs, their probability to hit a given site is constant, which means the flipping are happening at a fine granularity—per packet level, suggesting load balancing might be the cause to anycast routing flipping. Our findings confirm the common wisdom that anycast almost always works well, but provide evidence that a small number of locations in the Internet where specific anycast services are never stable.

This paper is joint work of Lan Wei and John Heidemann.  A pre-print of paper is at http://ant.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Wei17b.pdf, and the datasets from the paper are at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/anycast/index.html#stability.

Categories
Announcements Collaborations Papers

best paper award at PAM 2017

The PAM 2017 best paper award for “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?”

Congratulations to Ricardo de Oliveira Schmidt (U. Twente), John Heidemann (USC/ISI), and Jan Harm Kuipers (U. Twente) for the award of  best paper at the Conference on Passive and Active Measurement (PAM) 2017 to their paper “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?”.

See our prior blog post for more information about the paper and its data, and the U. Twente blog post about the paper and the SIDN Labs blog post about the paper.

Categories
Presentations

new talk “DNS Privacy, Service Management, and Research: Friends or Foes” at the NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop 2017

John Heidemann gave the talk “DNS Privacy, Service Management, and Research: Friends or Foes” at the NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on Feburary 26, 2017.  Slides are available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann17a.pdf.
The talk does not have a formal abstract, but to summarize:

A slide from the [Heidemann17a] talk, looking at what different DNS stakeholders may want.
A slide from the [Heidemann17a] talk, looking at what different DNS stakeholders may want.

This invited talk is part of a panel on the tension between DNS privacy and service management.  In the talk I expand on that topic and discuss
the tension between DNS privacy, service management, and research.
I give suggestions about how service management and research can adapt to proceed while still providing basic privacy.

Although not discussed in the talks, we distribute some DNS datasets,  available at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/ and at https://impactcybertrust.org.  We also provide dnsanon, a tool to anonymize DNS queries.