Categories
Papers Publications Uncategorized

new conference paper “Efficient Processing of Streaming Data using Multiple Abstractions

We have published a new paper “Efficient Processing of Streaming Data using Multiple Abstractions” at the IEEE Cloud 2021 conference. (to be available at https://conferences.computer.org/cloud/2021/

We show that one framework can efficiently support multiple abstractions. We provide three abstractions of Block, Windowed, and Stateful streaming and demonstrate that many application classes can be developed with ease, correctness, and low processing latency.

From the abstract of our paper:

Large websites and distributed systems employ sophisticated analytics to evaluate successes to celebrate and problems to be addressed. As analytics grow, different teams often require different frameworks, with dozens of packages supporting with streaming and batch processing, SQL and no-SQL. Bringing multiple frameworks to bear on a large, changing dataset often create challenges where data transitions—these impedance mismatches can create brittle glue logic and performance problems that consume developer time. We propose Plumb, a meta-framework that can bridge three different abstractions to meet the needs of a large class of applications in a common workflow. Large-block streaming (Block-Streaming) is suitable for single-pass applications that care about the temporal and spatial locality. Windowed-Streaming allows applications to process a group of data and many reductions. Stateful-Streaming enables applications to keep a long-term state and always-on behavior. We show that it is possible to bridge abstractions, with a common, high-level workflow specification, while the system transitions data batch processing and block- and record-level streaming as required. The challenge in bridging abstractions is to minimize latency while allowing applications to select between sequential and parallel operation, while handling out-of-order data delivery, component failures, and providing clear semantics in the face of missing data. We demonstrate these abstractions evaluating a 10-stage workflow of DNS analytics that has been in production use with Plumb for 2 years, comparing to a brittle hand-built system that has run for more than 3 years.

This conference paper is joint work of Abdul Qadeer and  John Heidemann from USC/ISI.

Plumb is open source software and will be available at: https://ant.isi.edu/software/plumb/index.html

Categories
Data

fighting bit rot in log-term data archives with babarchive

As part of research at ANT we generate a lot of data, and our goal is to keep it safe even in the face of an imperfect world of data storage.

When we say a lot, we mean hundreds of terabytes: As of May 2020, we have releasable 860 datasets making up 134 TB of storage (510TB if we uncompressed it). We provide this data at no cost to researchers, and since 2008 we’ve provided 2049 datasets (338 TB, or 1.1PB if uncompressed!) to 406 researchers!

These datasets range from packet captures of “normal” traffic, to curated captures of DDoS attacks, as well as dozens of research paper-specific datasets, 16 years of Internet censuses and 7 years of Internet outages, plus target lists for IPv4 that are regularly used for traffic studies and tools like Verfploeter anycast mapping.

As part of keeping this data, our goal is to keep this data. We want to fight bit rot and data loss. That means the RAID-6 for primary storage, with monitoring and timely disk replacement. It means off site backup (with a big thanks to our collaborators at Colorado State University, Christos Papadopoulos, Craig Partridge, and Dimitrios Kounalakis for their help). And it means watching bits to make sure they don’t spontaneously change.

One might think that bits at rest stay at rest, but… not always. We’ve seen three times when disks have spontaneously changed a byte over the last 20 years. In 2011 and 2012 I had bit flips on my personal files, and in 2020 we had a byte flip on a packet capture.

How do we know? We have application-level checksums of every file, and every day we take 10 minutes to check at least one dataset against its checksums. (Over time, we cover all datasets and then start all over.)

Our checksumming software is babarchive–our own wrapper around collecting SHA-256 checksums over a directory tree. We encourage other researchers interested in long-term data curation to carry out active content monitoring (in addition to backups and RAID).

A huge thanks to our research sponsors: DHS (through the LANDER, LACREND, and LACANIC projects), NSF (through the MADCAT, MR-Net), and DARPA (through GAWSEED).

Categories
Software releases

release of the cryptopANT library for IP address anonymization

cryptopANT v1.0 (stable) has been released (available at https://ant.isi.edu/software/cryptopANT/)

cryptopANT is a C library for IP address anonymization using crypto-PAn algorithm, originally defined by Georgia Tech. The library supports anonymization and de-anonymization (provided you possess a secret key) of IPv4, IPv6, and MAC addresses. The software release includes sample utilities that anonymize IP addresses in text, but we expect most use of the library will be as part of other programs. The Crypto-PAn anonymization scheme was developed by Xu, Fan, Ammar, and Moon at Georgia Tech and described in“Prefix-Preserving IP Address Anonymization”, Computer Networks, Volume 46, Issue 2, 7 October 2004, Pages 253-272, Elsevier. Our library is independent (and not binary compatible) of theirs.

Despite this being the first release as a library, the code has been in use for more than 10 years in other tools.  It had been part of our other software packages, such as dag_scrubber for years.  By popular request, we’re finally releasing it as a separate package.

The library is packaged with an example binary (scramble_ips) that can be used to anonymize text ips.

See also the crypto-PAn page at Georgia Tech here.

Categories
Announcements Projects

new project “Interactive Internet Outages Visualization to Assess Disaster Recovery”

We are happy to announce a new project, Interactive Internet Outages Visualization to Assess Disaster Recovery.   This project is supporting the use of Internet outage measurements to help understand and recover from natural disasters. It will expand on the visualization of Internet outages found at https://ant.isi.edu/outage/world/.

This visualization was initially seeded by a Michael Keston research grant here at ISI, and the outage measurement techniques and ongoing data collection has been developed with the support of DHS (the LANDER-2007, LACREND, LACANIC, and Retro-future Bridge and Outages projects).

Categories
In-the-news Internet Outages

Evaluation of Hurricane Harvey’s Effects on the Internet’s Edge

On August 25, 2017 Hurricane Harvey made landfall in south Texas, causing widespread property damage, displacing more than 30,000 people, and costing more than 45 lives (as of 2017-09-01).

We sympathize with those were hurt by this disaster, and hope for swift recovery for the region.

We recently examined the effects of Hurricane Harvey on the area using Trinocular, our internet outage detection system.  Two key results:

Trinocular report on outages in Texas after Hurricane Harvey (on 2017-08-28t03:32Z)

We see that landfall was followed by widespread Internet outages in the Corpus Christi area, with 40% or more home networks dropping off the Internet.

We see that over the following days, network outages grew in the Houston area, with many networks dropping off the Internet. However, the fraction of networks lost in Houston was much smaller than in the Corpus Christi area.

More details are on our Hurricane Harvey web page.  We will update that page as we get more data in.

The dataset including Hurricane Harvey will be internet_outage_adaptive_a29all-20170702 and will be released in October 2017. Until the full data is released, we have a preliminary dataset through August 2017 available on request.

Categories
Papers Publications

new conference paper “Do You See Me Now? Sparsity in Passive Observations of Address Liveness” in TMA 2017

The paper “Do You See Me Now? Sparsity in Passive Observations of Address Liveness” will appear in the 2017 Conference on Network Traffic Measurement and Analyais (TMA) July 21-23, 2017 in Dublin, Ireland.   The datasets from the paper that we can make public will be at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/sparsity/.

Visibility of addresses and blocks from possible /24 virtual monitors (Figure 2 from [Mirkovic17a])
From the abstract of the paper:

Accurate information about address and block usage in the Internet has many applications in planning address allocation, topology studies, and simulations. Prior studies used active probing, sometimes augmented with passive observation, to study macroscopic phenomena, such as the overall usage of the IPv4 address space. This paper instead studies the completeness of passive sources: how well they can observe microscopic phenomena such as address usage within a given network. We define sparsity as the limitation of a given monitor to see a target, and we quantify the effects of interest, temporal, and coverage sparsity. To study sparsity, we introduce inverted analysis, a novel approach that uses complete passive observations of a few end networks (three campus networks in our case) to infer what of these networks would be seen by millions of virtual monitors near their traffic’s destinations. Unsurprisingly, we find that monitors near popular content see many more targets and that visibility is strongly influenced by bipartite traffic between clients and servers. We are the first to quantify these effects and show their implications for the study of Internet liveness from passive observations. We find that visibility is heavy-tailed, with only 0.5% monitors seeing more than 10\% of our targets’ addresses, and is most affected by interest sparsity over temporal and coverage sparsity. Visibility is also strongly bipartite. Monitors of a different class than a target (e.g., a server monitor observing a client target) outperform monitors of the same class as a target in 82-99% of cases in our datasets. Finally, we find that adding active probing to passive observations greatly improves visibility of both server and client target addresses, but is not critical for visibility of target blocks. Our findings are valuable to understand limitations of existing measurement studies, and to develop methods to maximize microscopic completeness in future studies.

Categories
Announcements Data Internet

ANT IPv4 census appears in Library of Congress Blog on Innovative Mapping

John Hessler, a member of the US Library of Congress’ Geography and Map Division wrote a nice blog post about our IPv4 Internet maps: “Computing Space V: Mapping the Web or Pinging your Way to Infinity“.  Check out his take on our IPv4 data!

You too can browse the IPv4 Internet at our website.  Or for detailed analysis, get the data from IMPACT or us.

Thanks to the DHS IMPACT program for supporting collection of this data.

Categories
Presentations

new talk “Collecting and Visualizing Outages Over the Long Haul” at the AIMS Workshop 2017

John Heidemann gave the talk “Collecting and Visualizing Outages Over the Long Haul” at CAIDA’s Active Internet Measurement (AIMS) Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on March 2, 2017.  Slides are available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann17b.pdf.
From the abstract:

Unmeasurable blocks over time, a challenge in long-haul outage measurement, from [Alwabel15a]
We have been collecting data about outages in the Internet since Oct. 2014. Our outage detection system, Trinocular, uses active probing from four sites to study about 4 million /24 IPv4 address blocks. Long-duration measurements bring challenges that don’t occur in short observations. Most importantly, our target (“the Internet”) changes as we measure it, as new blocks come on-line, old blocks are reused in different ways, and ISPs observe and sometimes block our traffic. Our measurement platform also sees occasional hardware failures. Visualization can assist detection of these problems, allowing human perception to detect changes in data collection that have not previously been anticipated. This talk will discuss the challenges of long-term outage measurement and describe our new algorithm that scales to support clustering of 4M blocks and 3 months of observations for visualization.
Our visualization is joint work with Yuri Pradkin, and analysis of our long-term outages includes work with Abdulla Alwabel.

This talk draws on work from [Alwabel15a].  Data from this talk is available at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/outage/, and visualizations can be found at https://ant.isi.edu/outage/browse/.

Categories
Software releases

mtracecap: New utility for multi-point capture released

mtracecap v0.1 (beta) has been released (available at https://ant.isi.edu/software/mtracecap/index.html)

This tool is designed to capture packets from multiple sources and write its output to a single file.  Its build requires a local install of libtrace library (version 4.0 or older) and supports all sources supported by the library, such as pcap based interfaces, linux-specific ring interfaces, pcap and erf outputs and many more!  See them all listed when you run mtracecap with -H option.  DAG device capture is optional, depending on local DAG libraries being present.

An important feature of this tool is being able to roll output into multiple files either based on either maximum file size (e.g.  “-S 100” option will make it write output in 100MB chunks), or system time (e.g. “-G 180” option will rotate output every 180 seconds).

Finally, the tool can use external commands to work on the input before writing it to a file using a pipe (see –pipeout option).  This can be useful if you want to compute some statistics on the fly or compress output using an external compressor.  Using this option will eliminate extra disk read-write operations if all you want to do is to compress the output.

Categories
Papers Publications

new conference paper “Anycast vs. DDoS: Evaluating the November 2015 Root DNS Event” in IMC 2016

The paper “Anycast vs. DDoS: Evaluating the November 2015 Root DNS Event” will appear at ACM Internet Measurement Conference in November 2016 in Santa Monica, California, USA. (available at http://www.isi.edu/~weilan/PAPER/IMC2016camera.pdf)

From the abstract:

RIPE Atlas VPs going to different anycast sites when under stress. Colors indicate different sites, with black showing unsuccessful queries. [Moura16b, figure 11b]

Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks continue to be a major threat in the Internet today. DDoS attacks overwhelm target services with requests or other traffic, causing requests from legitimate users to be shut out. A common defense against DDoS is to replicate the service in multiple physical locations or sites. If all sites announce a common IP address, BGP will associate users around the Internet with a nearby site,defining the catchment of that site. Anycast addresses DDoS both by increasing capacity to the aggregate of many sites, and allowing each catchment to contain attack traffic leaving other sites unaffected. IP anycast is widely used for commercial CDNs and essential infrastructure such as DNS, but there is little evaluation of anycast under stress. This paper provides the first evaluation of several anycast services under stress with public data. Our subject is the Internet’s Root Domain Name Service, made up of 13 independently designed services (“letters”, 11 with IP anycast) running at more than 500 sites. Many of these services were stressed by sustained traffic at 100 times normal load on Nov.30 and Dec.1, 2015. We use public data for most of our analysis to examine how different services respond to the these events. We see how different anycast deployments respond to stress, and identify two policies: sites may absorb attack traffic, containing the damage but reducing service to some users, or they may withdraw routes to shift both good and bad traffic to other sites. We study how these deployments policies result in different levels of service to different users. We also show evidence of collateral damage on other services located near the attacks.

This IMC paper is joint work of  Giovane C. M. Moura, Moritz Müller, Cristian Hesselman (SIDN Labs), Ricardo de O. Schmidt, Wouter B. de Vries (U. Twente), John Heidemann, Lan Wei (USC/ISI). Datasets in this paper are derived from RIPE Atlas and are available at http://traces.simpleweb.org/ and at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/anycast/.