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Presentations

Deep Dive into DNS at IETF108

The Domain Name System (DNS) is responsible for handling the initial steps of almost all connections on the Internet. USC/ISI’s Wes Hardaker, along with Geoff Houston and Joao Damas from APNIC, gave a “Deep Dive” presentation on how the DNS works at the 108th IETF conference. The recording is available on YouTube for those that missed it.

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Presentations

new talk “A First Look at Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (MINCEQ)” at Digital Technologies for COVID-19 Webinar Series

John Heidemann gave the talk “A First Look at Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (MINCEQ)” at Digital Technologies for COVID-19 Webinar Series, hosted by Craig Knoblock and Bhaskar Krishnamachari of USC Viterbi School of Engineering on May 29, 2020. Internet Outages: Reliablity and Security” at the University of Oregon Cybersecurity Day in Eugene, Oregon on April 23, 2018.  A video of the talk is on YoutTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tduZ1Y_FX0s. Slides are available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann20a.pdf.

From the abstract:

Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (RAPID-MINCEQ) is a project to measure changes in Internet use during the COVID-19 outbreak of 2020.

Today social distancing and work-from-home/study-from-home are the best tools we have to limit COVID’s spread. But implementation of these policies varies in the US and around the global, and we would like to evaluate participation in these policies.
This project plans to develop two complementary methods of assessing Internet use by measuring address activity and how it changes relative to historical trends. Changes in the Internet can reflect work-from-home behavior. Although we cannot see all IP addresses (many are hidden behind firewalls or home routers), early work shows changes at USC and ISI.


This project is support by an NSF RAPID grant for COVID-19 and just began in May 2020, so this talk will discuss directions we plan to explore.

This project is joint work of Guillermo Baltra, Asma Enayet, John Heidemann, Yuri Pradkin, and Xiao Song and is supported by NSF/CISE as award NSF-2028279.

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Presentations

Talks at DNS-OARC 61

Wes Hardaker gave two presentations at DNS-OARC on November 1st, 2019. The first was a presentation about the previously announced “Cache me if you can” paper, which is on youtube, and the slides are available as well. The second talk presented Haoyu Jiang’s work during the summer of 2018 on analyzing DNS B-Root traffic during the 2018 DITL data for levels of traffic sent by the Chrome web browser, levels of traffic associated with different languages, and levels of traffic sent by different label lengths. It is available on youtube with the slides here.

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Presentations

new talk “Internet Outages: Reliablity and Security” from U. of Oregon Cybersecurity Day 2018

John Heidemann gave the talk “Internet Outages: Reliablity and Security” at the University of Oregon Cybersecurity Day in Eugene, Oregon on April 23, 2018.  Slides are available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann18e.pdf.

Network outages as a security problem.

From the abstract:

The Internet is central to our lives, but we know astoundingly little about it. Even though many businesses and individuals depend on it, how reliable is the Internet? Do policies and practices make it better in some places than others?

Since 2006, we have been studying the public face of the Internet to answer these questions. We take regular censuses, probing the entire IPv4 Internet address space. For more than two years we have been observing Internet reliability through active probing with Trinocular outage detection, revealing the effects of the Internet due to natural disasters like Hurricanes from Sandy to Harvey and Maria, configuration errors that sometimes affect millions of customers, and political events where governments have intervened in Internet operation. This talk will describe how it is possible to observe Internet outages today and what they are beginning to say about the Internet and about the physical world.

This talk builds on research over the last decade in IPv4 censuses and outage detection and includes the work of many of my collaborators.

Data from this talk is all available; see links on the last slide.

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DNS Papers Presentations Publications

New paper and talk “Enumerating Privacy Leaks in DNS Data Collected above the Recursive” at NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop 2018

Basileal Imana presented the paper “Enumerating Privacy Leaks in DNS Data Collected  above the Recursive” at NDSS DNS Privacy Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on February 18, 2018. Talk slides are available at https://ant.isi.edu/~imana/presentations/Imana18b.pdf and paper is available at  https://ant.isi.edu/~imana/papers/Imana18a.pdf, or can be found at the DNS privacy workshop page.

From the abstract:

Threat model for enumerating leaks above the recursive (left). Percentage of four categories of queries containing IPv4 addresses in their QNAMEs. (right)

As with any information system consisting of data derived from people’s actions, DNS data is vulnerable to privacy risks. In DNS, users make queries through recursive resolvers to authoritative servers. Data collected below (or in) the recursive resolver directly exposes users, so most prior DNS data sharing focuses on queries above the recursive resolver. Data collected above a recursive resolver has largely been seen as posing a minimal privacy risk since recursive resolvers typically aggregate traffic for many users, thereby hiding their identity and mixing their traffic. Although this assumption is widely made, to our knowledge it has not been verified. In this paper we re-examine this assumption for DNS traffic above the recursive resolver. First, we show that two kinds of information appear in query names above the recursive resolver: IP addresses and sensitive domain names, such as those pertaining to health, politics, or personal or lifestyle information. Second, we examine how often these classes of potentially sensitive names appear in Root DNS traffic, using 48 hours of B-Root data from April 2017.

This is a joint work by Basileal Imana (USC), Aleksandra Korolova (USC) and John Heidemann (USC/ISI).

The DITL dataset (ITL_B_Root-20170411) used in this work is available from DHS IMPACT, the ANT project, and through DNS-OARC.

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DNS Presentations

new talk “LocalRoot: Serve Yourself”

Wes Hardaker gave a talk on his LocalRoot project, allowing recursive resolver operators to keep an up to date cached copy of the root zone data available at all times. The talk was held in Abu Dhabi on November 1, 2017 at the ICANN annual general meeting during the DNSSEC Workshop. Slides and recorded video are available at on the ICANN event page.

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Presentations

new talk “Verfploeter: Broad and Load-Aware Anycast Mapping”

Wes Hardaker gave the talk “Verfploeter: Broad and Load-Aware Anycast Mapping” at DNS-OARC in San Jose, California, USA on September 29, 2017.  Slides are available at on the event page.

From the abstract:

IP anycast provides DNS operators and CDNs with automatic fail-over and reduced latency by breaking the Internet into catchments,each served by a different anycast site. Unfortunately, understanding and predicting changes to catchments as sites are added or removed has been challenging. Current tools such as RIPE Atlas or commercial equivalents map from thousands of vantage points (VPs),but their coverage can be inconsistent around the globe. This paper proposes Verfploeter, a new method that maps anycast catchments using active probing. Verfploeter provides around 3.8M virtual VPs, 430 times the 9k physical VPs in RIPE Atlas,providing coverage of the vast majority of networks around the globe. We then add load information from prior service logs to provide calibrated predictions of anycast changes. Verfploeter has been used to evaluate the new anycast for B-Root, and we also report its use of a nine-site anycast testbed. We show that the greater coverage made possible by Verfploeter’s active probing is necessary to see routing differences in regions that have sparse coverage from RIPE Atlas, like South America and China.

 

A video of the talk is available On YouTube.

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Presentations

new talk “Digging in to Ground Truth in Network Measurements” at the TMA PhD School 2017

John Heidemann gave the talk “Digging in to Ground Truth in Network Measurements” at the TMA PhD School 2017 in Dublin, Ireland on June 19, 2017.  Slides are available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann17c.pdf.
From the abstract:

New network measurements are great–you can learn about the whole world! But new network measurements are horrible–are you sure you learn about the world, and not about bugs in your code or approach? New scientific approaches must be tested and ultimately calibrated against ground truth. Yet ground truth about the Internet can be quite difficult—often network operators themselves do not know all the details of their network. This talk will explore the role of ground truth in network measurement: getting it when you can, alternatives when it’s imperfect, and what we learn when none is available.

 

This talk builds on research over the last decade with many people, and the slides include some discussion from the TMA PhD school audience.

Travel to the TMA PhD school was supported by ACM, ISI, and the DHS Retro-Future Bridge and Outages project.

Update 2017-07-05: The TMA folks have posted video of this “Ground Truth” talk to YouTube if you want to relive the glory of a warm afternoon in Dublin.

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Presentations

new talk “Infrastructure for Experimental Replay and Mutation of DNS Queries” at the AIMS Workshop 2017

John Heidemann gave the talk “Infrastructure for Experimental Replay and Mutation of DNS Queries” at CAIDA’s Active Internet Measurement (AIMS) Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on March 2, 2017.  Slides are available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Zhu17a.pdf.
From the abstract:

Emulating the DNS hierarchy both efficiently and correctly.

The DNS ecosystem today is revisiting basic design questions: should it encourage TCP? TLS? DTLS? Something completely new like QUIC or HTTP? While modeling and analysis help answer some of these questions, experimental evaluation is necessary for validation, and in some cases the only way to get accurate estimates of software memory use and performance. This talk will discuss our recent work in supporting experimental evaluation of DNS with components that support trace replay and evaluation. Trace replay is supported by a DNS data archive to prime replay with real data, and a query mutation system to support what-if evaluation using variations of that data.

The trace replay system is the work with Liang Zhu; this work is part of a larger system to support DNS experimentation, joint work with Wes Hardaker.

The software discussed in the talk is available at https://ant.isi.edu/software/ldplayer, and this work is part of our progress towards the NIPET testbed.

 

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Presentations

new talk “Collecting and Visualizing Outages Over the Long Haul” at the AIMS Workshop 2017

John Heidemann gave the talk “Collecting and Visualizing Outages Over the Long Haul” at CAIDA’s Active Internet Measurement (AIMS) Workshop in San Diego, California, USA on March 2, 2017.  Slides are available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann17b.pdf.
From the abstract:

Unmeasurable blocks over time, a challenge in long-haul outage measurement, from [Alwabel15a]
We have been collecting data about outages in the Internet since Oct. 2014. Our outage detection system, Trinocular, uses active probing from four sites to study about 4 million /24 IPv4 address blocks. Long-duration measurements bring challenges that don’t occur in short observations. Most importantly, our target (“the Internet”) changes as we measure it, as new blocks come on-line, old blocks are reused in different ways, and ISPs observe and sometimes block our traffic. Our measurement platform also sees occasional hardware failures. Visualization can assist detection of these problems, allowing human perception to detect changes in data collection that have not previously been anticipated. This talk will discuss the challenges of long-term outage measurement and describe our new algorithm that scales to support clustering of 4M blocks and 3 months of observations for visualization.
Our visualization is joint work with Yuri Pradkin, and analysis of our long-term outages includes work with Abdulla Alwabel.

This talk draws on work from [Alwabel15a].  Data from this talk is available at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/outage/, and visualizations can be found at https://ant.isi.edu/outage/browse/.