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Presentations Publications

new poster “Measuring the Internet during Covid-19 to Evaluate Work-from-Home” at the NSF PREPARE-VO Workshop

Xiao Song presented the poster “Measuring the Internet during Covid-19 to Evaluate Work-from-Home (poster)” at the NSF PREPARE-VO Workshop on 2020-12-15. Xiao describes the poster in our video.

A case study network showing network changes as a result of work-from-home. Here we know ground truth and can see weekly work behavior (the groups of five bumps), followed by changes on the right in March when work-from-home begins.

There was no formal abstract, but this poster presents early results from examining Internet address changes to identify work-from-home resulting from Covid-19.

This work is part of the MINCEQ project, supported as an NSF CISE RAPID, NSF-2028279.

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Presentations

new talk “A First Look at Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (MINCEQ)” at Digital Technologies for COVID-19 Webinar Series

John Heidemann gave the talk “A First Look at Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (MINCEQ)” at Digital Technologies for COVID-19 Webinar Series, hosted by Craig Knoblock and Bhaskar Krishnamachari of USC Viterbi School of Engineering on May 29, 2020. Internet Outages: Reliablity and Security” at the University of Oregon Cybersecurity Day in Eugene, Oregon on April 23, 2018.  A video of the talk is on YoutTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tduZ1Y_FX0s. Slides are available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann20a.pdf.

From the abstract:

Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (RAPID-MINCEQ) is a project to measure changes in Internet use during the COVID-19 outbreak of 2020.

Today social distancing and work-from-home/study-from-home are the best tools we have to limit COVID’s spread. But implementation of these policies varies in the US and around the global, and we would like to evaluate participation in these policies.
This project plans to develop two complementary methods of assessing Internet use by measuring address activity and how it changes relative to historical trends. Changes in the Internet can reflect work-from-home behavior. Although we cannot see all IP addresses (many are hidden behind firewalls or home routers), early work shows changes at USC and ISI.


This project is support by an NSF RAPID grant for COVID-19 and just began in May 2020, so this talk will discuss directions we plan to explore.

This project is joint work of Guillermo Baltra, Asma Enayet, John Heidemann, Yuri Pradkin, and Xiao Song and is supported by NSF/CISE as award NSF-2028279.

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Announcements Projects

new project “Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine” (MINCEQ)

We are happy to announce a new project “Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine” (MINCEQ).

Measuring the Internet during Novel Coronavirus to Evaluate Quarantine (RAPID-MINCEQ) is a project to measure changes in Internet use during the COVID-19 outbreak of 2020. As the world grapples with COVID-19, work-from-home and study-from-home are widely employed. Implementation of these policies varies across the U.S. and globally due to local circumstances. A common consequence is a huge shift in Internet use, with schools and workplaces emptying and home Internet use increasing. The goal of this project is to observe this shift, globally, through changes in Internet address usage, allowing observation of early reactions to COVID and, one hopes, a future shift back.

This project plans to develop two complementary methods of assessing Internet use by measuring address activity and how it changes relative to historical trends. The project will directly measure Internet address use globally based on continuous, ongoing measurements of more than 4 million IPv4 networks. The project will also directly measure Internet address use in network traffic at a regional Internet exchange point where multiple Internet providers interconnect. The first approach provides a global picture, while the second provides a more detailed but regional picture; together they will help evaluate measurement accuracy.

The project website is at https://ant.isi.edu/minceq/index.html. The PI is John Heidemann. This work is supported by NSF as a RAPID award in response to COVID-19, award NSF-2028279.