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new paper “Old but Gold: Prospecting TCP to Engineer and Live Monitor DNS Anycast” Awarded Best Paper at the Passive and Active Measurement Conference

On March 29, 2022 the paper “Old but Gold: Prospecting TCP to Engineer and Live Monitor DNS Anycast” by Giovane C. M. Moura, John Heidemann, Wes Hardaker, Pithayuth Charnsethikul, Jeroen Bulten, João M. Ceron, and Cristian Hesselman appeared that the 2022 Passive and Active Measurement Conference. We’re happy that it was awarded Best Paper for this year’s conference!

From the abstract:

Google latency for .nl before (left red area) and after (middle green area) DNS polarization was corrected. Polarization was detected with ENTRADA using the work from this paper.

DNS latency is a concern for many service operators: CDNs exist to reduce service latency to end-users but must rely on global DNS for reachability and load-balancing. Today, DNS latency is monitored by active probing from distributed platforms like RIPE Atlas, with Verfploeter, or with commercial services. While Atlas coverage is wide, its 10k sites see only a fraction of the Internet. In this paper we show that passive observation of TCP handshakes can measure live DNS latency, continuously, providing good coverage of current clients of the service. Estimating RTT from TCP is an old idea, but its application to DNS has not previously been studied carefully. We show that there is sufficient TCP DNS traffic today to provide good operational coverage (particularly of IPv6), and very good temporal coverage (better than existing approaches), enabling near-real time evaluation of DNS latency from real clients. We also show that DNS servers can optionally solicit TCP to broaden coverage. We quantify coverage and show that estimates of DNS latency from TCP is consistent with UDP latency. Our approach finds previously unknown, real problems: DNS polarization is a new problem where a hypergiant sends global traffic to one anycast site rather than taking advantage of the global anycast deployment. Correcting polarization in Google DNS cut its latency from 100ms to 10ms; and from Microsoft Azure cut latency from 90ms to 20ms. We also show other instances of routing problems that add 100-200ms latency. Finally, real-time use of our approach for a European country-level domain has helped detect and correct a BGP routing misconfiguration that detoured European traffic to Australia. We have integrated our approach into several open source tools: Entrada, our open source data warehouse for DNS, a monitoring tool (ANTS), which has been operational for the last 2 years on a country-level top-level domain, and a DNS anonymization tool in use at a root server since March 2021.

The tools we developed in this paper are freely available, including patches to Knot, improvements to dnsanon, improvements to ENTRADA, and the new tool Anteater. Unfortunately data from the paper was from operational DNS systems and so cannot be shared due to privacy concerns.

This paper was made in part through DHS HSARPA Cyber Security Division via contract number HSHQDC-17-R-B0004-TTA.02-0006-I (PAADDOS) and by NWO, NSF CNS-1925737 (DIINER), and the Conconrdia Project, an European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program under Grant Agreement No 830927.

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Announcements Collaborations Papers

best paper award at PAM 2017

The PAM 2017 best paper award for “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?”

Congratulations to Ricardo de Oliveira Schmidt (U. Twente), John Heidemann (USC/ISI), and Jan Harm Kuipers (U. Twente) for the award of  best paper at the Conference on Passive and Active Measurement (PAM) 2017 to their paper “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?”.

See our prior blog post for more information about the paper and its data, and the U. Twente blog post about the paper and the SIDN Labs blog post about the paper.

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Announcements Collaborations Papers

best paper award at AINTEC 2016

Best paper award to Shah, Fontugne, and Papadopoulos at AINTEC 2016

Congratulations to Anant Shah, Christos Papadopoulos (Colorado State University) and Romain Fontugne (Internet Initiative Japan) for the award of  best paper at AINTEC 2016 to their paper “Towards Characterizing International Routing Detours”.

See our prior blog post for more information about the paper and its data, and the APNIC blog post about this paper.

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Papers Publications

new conference paper “Towards Characterizing International Routing Detours” in AINTEC 2016

The paper “Towards Characterizing International Routing Detours” appeared in the 12th Asian Internet Engineering Conference on Dec 1, 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand and is available at http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3012698. The datasets are available at http://geoinfo.bgpmon.io.

From the abstract:

There are currently no requirements (technical or otherwise) that routing paths must be contained within national boundaries. Indeed, some paths experience international detours, i.e., originate in one country, cross international boundaries and return to the same country. In most cases these are sensible traffic engineering or peering decisions at ISPs that serve multiple countries. In some cases such detours may be suspicious. Characterizing international detours is useful to a number of players: (a) network engineers trying to diagnose persistent problems, (b) policy makers aiming at adhering to certain national communication policies, (c) entrepreneurs looking for opportunities to deploy new networks, or (d) privacy-conscious states trying to minimize the amount of internal communication traversing different jurisdictions.

In this paper we characterize international detours in the Internet during the month of January 2016. To detect detours we sample BGP RIBs every 8 hours from 461 RouteViews and RIPE RIS peers spanning 30 countries. We use geolocation of ASes which geolocates each BGP prefix announced by each AS, mapping its presence at IXPs and geolocation infrastructure IPs. Finally, we analyze each global BGP RIB entry looking for detours. Our analysis shows more than 5K unique BGP prefixes experienced a detour. 132 prefixes experienced more than 50% of the detours. We observe about 544K detours. Detours either last for a few days or persist the entire month. Out of all the detours, more than 90% were transient detours that lasted for 72 hours or less. We also show different countries experience different characteristics of detours.

This work won the Best Paper Award at AINTEC 2016. APNIC blog post on this paper can be found here.

The work in this paper is by Anant Shah, Christos Papadopoulos (Colorado State University) and Romain Fontugne (Internet Initiative Japan).

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Papers Publications

new conference paper “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?” in PAM 2017

The paper “Anycast Latency: How Many Sites Are Enough?” will appear at PAM 2017, the Conference on Passive and Active Measurement in March 2017 in Sydney, Australia (available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Schmidt17a.pdf)

Update 2017-03-31:  This paper was awarded Best Paper at PAM 2017.

Median RTT (with quartiles as error bars) for countries with at least 5 vantage points for L-Root in 2015. Even more than 100 anycast sites, L still has relatively high latency in some countries in Africa and Asia.

 

 

 

From the abstract:

Anycast is widely used today to provide important services such as DNS and Content Delivery Networks (CDNs). An anycast service uses multiple sites to provide high availability, capacity and redundancy. BGP routing associates users to sites, defining the catchment that each site serves. Although prior work has studied how users associate with anycast services informally, in this paper we examine the key question how many anycast sites are needed to provide good latency, and the worst case latencies that specific deployments see. To answer this question, we first define the optimal performance that is possible, then explore how routing, specific anycast policies, and site location affect performance. We develop a new method capable of determining optimal performance and use it to study four real-world anycast services operated by different organizations: C-, F-, K-, and L-Root, each part of the Root DNS service. We measure their performance from more than 7,900 vantage points (VPs) worldwide using RIPE Atlas. (Given the VPs uneven geographic distribution, we evaluate and control for potential bias.) Our key results show that a few sites can provide performance nearly as good as many, and that geographic location and good connectivity have a far stronger effect on latency than having many sites. We show how often users see the closest anycast site, and how strongly routing policy affects site selection.

This paper is joint work of  Ricardo de Oliveira Schmidt, John Heidemann (USC/ISI), and Jan Harm Kuipers (U. Twente).  Datasets in this paper are derived from RIPE Atlas and are available at http://traces.simpleweb.org/ and at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/anycast/.