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new journal paper “Detecting IoT Devices in the Internet” in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

We have published a new journal paper “Detecting IoT Devices in the Internet” in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, available at https://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Guo20c.pdf

Figure 5 from [Guo20c] showing per-device-type AS penetrations from 2013 to 2018 for 16 of the 23 device types we studies (omitting 7 device types appearing in less than10 ASes)

From the abstract of our journal paper:

Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks launched from compromised Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices have shown how vulnerable the Internet is to largescale DDoS attacks. To understand the risks of these attacks requires learning about these IoT devices: where are they? how many are there? how are they changing? This paper describes three new methods to find IoT devices on the Internet: server IP addresses in traffic, server names in DNS queries, and manufacturer information in TLS certificates. Our primary methods (IP addresses and DNS names) use knowledge of servers run by the manufacturers of these devices. Our third method uses TLS certificates obtained by active scanning. We have applied our algorithms to a number of observations. With our IP-based algorithm, we report detections from a university campus over 4 months and from traffic transiting an IXP over 10 days. We apply our DNS-based algorithm to traffic from 8 root DNS servers from 2013 to 2018 to study AS-level IoT deployment. We find substantial growth (about 3.5×) in AS penetration for 23 types of IoT devices and modest increase in device type density for ASes detected with these device types (at most 2 device types in 80% of these ASes in 2018). DNS also shows substantial growth in IoT deployment in residential households from 2013 to 2017. Our certificate-based algorithm finds 254k IP cameras and network video recorders from 199 countries around the world.

We make operational traffic we captured from 10 IoT devices we own public at https://ant.isi.edu/datasets/iot/. We also use operational traffic of 21 IoT devices shared by University of New South Wales at http://149.171.189.1/.

This journal paper is joint work of Hang Guo and  John Heidemann from USC/ISI.

Categories
Papers Publications

new workshop paper “Privacy Principles for Sharing Cyber Security Data” in IWPE 15

The paper “Privacy Principles for Sharing Cyber Security Data” (available at https://www.isi.edu/~calvin/papers/Fisk15a.pdf) will appear at the International Workshop on Privacy Engineering (co-located with IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy) on May 21, 2015 in San Jose, California.

From the abstract:

Sharing cyber security data across organizational boundaries brings both privacy risks in the exposure of personal information and data, and organizational risk in disclosing internal information. These risks occur as information leaks in network traffic or logs, and also in queries made across organizations. They are also complicated by the trade-offs in privacy preservation and utility present in anonymization to manage disclosure. In this paper, we define three principles that guide sharing security information across organizations: Least Disclosure, Qualitative Evaluation, and Forward Progress. We then discuss engineering approaches that apply these principles to a distributed security system. Application of these principles can reduce the risk of data exposure and help manage trust requirements for data sharing, helping to meet our goal of balancing privacy, organizational risk, and the ability to better respond to security with shared information.

The work in the paper is by Gina Fisk (LANL), Calvin Ardi (USC/ISI), Neale Pickett (LANL), John Heidemann (USC/ISI), Mike Fisk (LANL), and Christos Papadopoulos (Colorado State). This work is supported by DHS S&T, Cyber Security division.