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Papers Publications

new conference paper “Trinocular: Understanding Internet Reliability Through Adaptive Probing” in SIGCOMM 2013

The paper “Trinocular: Understanding Internet Reliability Through Adaptive Probing” was accepted by SIGCOMM’13 in Hong Kong, China (available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Quan13c with cite and pdf, or direct pdf).

100% detection of outages one round or longer
100% detection of outages one round or longer (figure 3 from the paper)

From the abstract:

Natural and human factors cause Internet outages—from big events like Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and the Egyptian Internet shutdown in Jan. 2011 to small outages every day that go unpublicized. We describe Trinocular, an outage detection system that uses active probing to understand reliability of edge networks. Trinocular is principled: deriving a simple model of the Internet that captures the information pertinent to outages, and populating that model through long-term data, and learning current network state through ICMP probes. It is parsimonious, using Bayesian inference to determine how many probes are needed. On average, each Trinocular instance sends fewer than 20 probes per hour to each /24 network block under study, increasing Internet “background radiation” by less than 0.7%. Trinocular is also predictable and precise: we provide known precision in outage timing and duration. Probing in rounds of 11 minutes, we detect 100% of outages one round or longer, and estimate outage duration within one-half round. Since we require little traffic, a single machine can track 3.4M /24 IPv4 blocks, all of the Internet currently suitable for analysis. We show that our approach is significantly more accurate than the best current methods, with about one-third fewer false conclusions, and about 30% greater coverage at constant accuracy. We validate our approach using controlled experiments, use Trinocular to analyze two days of Internet outages observed from three sites, and re-analyze three years of existing data to develop trends for the Internet.

Citation: Lin Quan, John Heidemann and Yuri Pradkin. Trinocular: Understanding Internet Reliability Through Adaptive Probing. In Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM Conference. Hong Kong, China, ACM. August, 2013. <http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Quan13c>.

Datasets (listed here) used in generating this paper are available or will be available before the conference presentation.

Categories
Papers Publications

New conference paper “Evaluating Anycast in the Domain Name System” to appear at INFOCOM

The paper “Evaluating Anycast in the Domain Name System” (available at http://www.isi.edu/~xunfan/research/Fan13a.pdf) was accepted to appear at the IEEE International Conference (INFOCOM) on Computer Communications 2013 in Turin, Italy.

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Recall as number of vantage points vary. [Fan13a, figure 2]
From the abstract:

IP anycast is a central part of production DNS. While prior work has explored proximity, affinity and load balancing for some anycast services, there has been little attention to third-party discovery and enumeration of components of an anycast service. Enumeration can reveal abnormal service configurations, benign masquerading or hostile hijacking of anycast services, and help characterize anycast deployment. In this paper, we discuss two methods to identify and characterize anycast nodes. The first uses an existing anycast diagnosis method based on CHAOS-class DNS records but augments it with traceroute to resolve ambiguities. The second proposes Internet-class DNS records which permit accurate discovery through the use of existing recursive DNS infrastructure. We validate these two methods against three widely-used anycast DNS services, using a very large number (60k and 300k) of vantage points, and show that they can provide excellent precision and recall. Finally, we use these methods to evaluate anycast deployments in top-level domains (TLDs), and find one case where a third-party operates a server masquerading as a root DNS anycast node as well as a noticeable proportion of unusual DNS proxies. We also show that, across all TLDs, up to 72% use anycast.

Citation: Xun Fan, John Heidemann and Ramesh Govindan. Evaluating Anycast in the Domain Name System. To appear in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM). Turin, Italy. April, 2013. http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Fan13a.html

Categories
Announcements Data

Complete IPv4 geolocation dataset now available

complete_geoloc_map

We recently finished the work of geolocating all IPv4 addresses and plotted a “complete IP geolocation map“.

This work is based on our previous IMC paper “Towards Geolocation of Millions of IP Addresses“, joint work of Zi Hu, John Heidemann, and Yuri Pradkin.

Processed data from this work is visible on our browsable web map.  The raw data from this effort is available through PREDICT or from the authors.

Categories
Presentations

new talk “Long-term Data Collection and Analysis of Outages at the Edge” given at the AIMS workshop

John Heidemann gave the talk “Long-term Data Collection and Analysis of Outages at the Edge” at UCSD, San Diego, California on Feb. 8, 2013 as part of the CAIDA Active Internet Measurement Systems (AIMS) Workshop.  Slides are available at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann13e.html.

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This talk describes our analysis of outages in edge networks at the time of Hurricane Sandy, and how that work was enabled by long-term data collection. The analysis showed U.S. networks had double the outage rate (from 0.2% to 0.4%) on 2012-10-30, the day after Sandy landfall, and recovered after four days. We highlighted long-term data collection of Internet Surveys, a random sample of about 41,000 /24 blocks, and the characteristics that make that data suitable for re-analysis. The talk was part of the CAIDA Workshop on Active Internet Measurement Systems, hosted at UCSD.

This work is based on our recent technical report   “A Preliminary Analysis of Network Outages During Hurricane Sandy“, joint work of John Heidemann, Lin Quan, and Yuri Pradkin.

Categories
Presentations

new abstract “Third-Party Measurement of Network Outages in Hurricane Sandy” and talk with video at FCC Workshop on Network Resiliency

We recently posted our abstract “Third-Party Measurement of Network Outages in Hurricane Sandy” at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann13c.html and the talk “Active Probing of Edge Networks: Hurricane Sandy and Beyond” at http://www.isi.edu/~johnh/PAPERS/Heidemann13d.html

These were part of the FCC Workshop on Network Resiliency at Brooklyn Law College, Brooklyn, NY on Feb. 6, 2013, chaired by Henning Schulzrinne.

Video from our talk and for the whole workshop is on YouTube.

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A summary of the talk:

This talk summarized our analysis of outages in edge networks at the time of Hurricane Sandy. This analysis showed U.S. networks had double the outage rate (from 0.2% to 0.4%) on 2012-10-30, the day after Sandy landfall, and recovered after four days. It also describes our goal of tracking all outages in the Internet. The talk was part of the FCC workshop on Network Resiliency, hosted at Brooklyn Law College by Henning Schulzrinne.

This work is based on our recent technical report   “A Preliminary Analysis of Network Outages During Hurricane Sandy“, joint work of John Heidemann, Lin Quan, and Yuri Pradkin.